Happy Holidays from North Dallas Spine Center!

Wishing you health and happiness this Holiday Season and prosperity in the New Year. We value our customer relationships and thank you for being part of our family. We look forward to continuing to provide quality spinal care to you and your loved ones this holiday season and in the years to come.

NDSC Holiday Office Hours:

Monday, Dec. 23rd – Regular Office Hours
Tuesday, Dec 24th – Friday, December 27th – CLOSED
Monday, Dec 30th – Regular Office Hours
Tuesday, Dec. 31st – Regular Office Hours
Wednesday, Jan. 1st – CLOSED
Thursday, Jan. 2nd – Regular Office Hours
Friday, Jan. 3rd – CLOSED

Please call the office at (972) 916-9432 or email Miguel at frontdesk@northdallasspinecenter.com to schedule an appointment!

Yours in Good Health,
North Dallas Spine Center Team

Help us Feed the Hungry!

You are invited to join us in our 12th Annual Holiday Food Drive!

At North Dallas Spine Center, we have been doing the Food Drive now for many years. Join with us in making this the most successful Food Drive yet!

You can help us reach our goal. We want to…

  • Donate $5,000 in services
  • Collect $3,000 in food donations

New Patients
Monday, November 4th thru Thursday, November 14th, 2013

Your referral will receive $300 off New Patient services for the donation of one bag of non-perishable food items! This offer will be applied to any necessary x-rays, exams, and consultation. This is a great opportunity to share chiropractic with friends, family and co-workers. Tell them all about our Holiday Food Drive!

Established Patients
Thursday, November 14th, 2013

On November 14th of our Food Drive, established patients can receive an extra visit for the donation of one grocery bag of non-perishable food. Make a difference in your life and the life of the community! Participate by referring friends, family, or bring a bag of groceries in on Thursday, 11/14 and receive an extra NUCCA visit (appt necessary).

Or, if you donate through our Virtual Food Drive (here) and print your e-mail confirmation, you can also receive an extra NUCCA visit (appt necessary).

So, in conclusion, there are three ways to participate in the Food Drive

  1. Refer a friend, family member or co-worker to begin care during the Food Drive and they will receive $300 off New Patient services for the donation of 1 bag of groceries.
  2. Visit us on Thursday, Nov. 14th with a bag of groceries to receive an extra NUCCA office visit (appointment necessary).
  3. Donate through our Virtual Food Drive and print your email confirmation to receive an extra NUCCA office visit on Thursday, Nov. 4, 2013. (appointment necessary).

Breaking Emotional Barriers

Quality of life is not strictly about pain itself. Instead, it is about how you react to your pain. You can expect pain to take an emotional toll: That is normal, maybe even inevitable. But people respond to pain differently, and research makes clear that some ways of responding lead to less pain and better outcomes than others.

To get an idea of how you are responding to pain, Michael R. Clark, M.D., director of the chronic pain treatment program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine suggests you think about the goals you may have established for your life. “For people who are not in pain, this is relatively easy,” he says. “They are usually established in careers and relationships, and it is second nature when they wake up in the morning to know what they are striving for and where they are heading. People with chronic pain, on the other hand, often feel that life is passing them by. Their only goal is to get through the day. Often they wonder, ‘Is this all life can be?”

The answer, according to Clark: There is more. “You have opportunities for success and fulfillment, but if you are in chronic pain, you may need to think more assertively about what you need to achieve your goals.” These goals may be different now than they were before pain saddled you. But evaluating how to reach them is no different: Look objectively at your strengths and weaknesses (perhaps including personality, skills, and education), and try to identify activities or ambitions that match your capabilities. Sound like a familiar process? Then the next question becomes critical: What is holding you back?

For many people in chronic pain, the answer comes down to emotional barriers. These may include depression, anxiety, anger, or loss of self-esteem, along with issues these negative feelings become entangled with, such as weight gain and deteriorating relationships – all of which can make pain more difficult to deal with and quality of life more difficult to achieve.

If you or someone you know is suffering from chronic back pain or neck pain, spinal injury, pinched nerve, etc., do not hesitate to call the North Dallas Spine Center at (972) 916-9432 to receive the care you need.

North Dallas Spine Center – 972-916-9432
7708 San Jacinto Place, Suite 300, Plano, TX 75024

Coping With Pain

Thomas Jefferson once wrote in a letter that “the art of life is the art of avoiding pain.” But when pain becomes unavoidable, what happens to the art of life? Jefferson may not have addressed the point, but millions of people in chronic pain deal with this question day after day.

Doctors are starting to deal with the question as well. Once attuned mainly to medical outcomes, pain specialist (and other physicians) increasingly recognize that the well-being of people with chronic conditions hinges on far more than physical problems or discomfort.

Take the case of arthritis sufferers. In a recent survey of more than 32,000 adults, those with arthritis reported being in poor-to-fair health three times more often than other people did. Maybe that is not surprising when you are talking about the top cause of disability in the United States. But the survey went beyond how arthritis affected people physically to ask how they felt mentally and how often their condition prevented them from participating in regular activities-in short, how well they were coping and getting along. In both cases, people who had arthritis again suffered more than people who did not.

Such findings point to the importance of what is come to be called health-related quality of life. It is a concept that considers not only the medical measures of your condition-whether you give your pain a 3 or a 7, for example, or how far you can bend your knee-but emotional, social, and other subjective aspects of life as well. It may seem abundantly self-evident that quality of life erodes when you are in constant discomfort. But in many cases, pain chips away so slowly at function, feelings, and favorite activities that patients are not aware of how-or how much-life has changed. For example, if you have given up tennis because of knee pain, it may not strike you that other enjoyable activities that once seemed important, such as attending matches as a spectator, have also fallen by the wayside.

“Nobody suffering from chronic pain is going to be happy and satisfied about that,” says Michael R. Clark, M.D., director of the chronic pain treatment program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s department of psychiatry and behavioral medicine. “The question is what you want out of life and what you can change to make your quality of life better.”

If you or someone you know is suffering from chronic back or neck pain, spinal injury, pinched nerve, etc., do not hesitate to call the North Dallas Spine Center at (972) 916-9432 to receive the care you need.

North Dallas Spine Center – 972-916-9432
7708 San Jacinto Place, Suite 300, Plano, TX 75024